Exit the King

Exit the King

There are many reasons why you should see Exit the King, but foremost among them is the opportunity to see a brilliant physical comic performance by Geoffrey Rush. My companion at the show is an alumnus of L'École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq, and he told me that the reason he was particularly excited to see this show is that Rush is an alumnus as well.

Sorry, Your Highness, but You're So Over

This has to be the liveliest death on record. Never mind those scary figures of legend who kept on fighting with bullets, poisons and knives in their guts: Rasputin, Blackbeard, that psychopath from the "Halloween" movies. When it comes to refusing to shuffle off the old mortal coil, these men are all small time compared to his moribund majesty King Berenger, whose last hours on earth have been brought to life like a fire-trailing comet by Geoffrey Rush.

Exit the King

Plays about dying really don't get any funnier than Eugene Ionesco's Exit the King, now getting a rare Broadway revival at the Barrymore Theatre. But getting laughs isn't all that this piece is about; as the work unspools with wild and sometimes joyful abandon in Neil Armfield's beautifully calibrated production, it proves both cuttingly topical and surprisingly touching.

Exit the King

"Nothing's abnormal when abnormal has become the new normal," declares Geoffrey Rush, a short distance into his astonishing performance as the dying monarch in "Exit the King." It's that state of pervasive uncertainty, in a world thrown into chaos as an empire crumbles, that rescues Eugene Ionesco's 1962 absurdist tragedy from the dusty vaults and infuses it with unexpected currency.